Gustav Metzger

Gustav Metzger was born in Nuremberg, Germany on 10 April 1926 to Polish-Jewish parents and arrived in Britain on the Kindertransport in 1939. From 1945 to 1953, he studied art in Cambridge, London, Antwerp and Oxford. By 1958, Metzger was becoming heavily involved in anti-capitalist, anti-consumerist movements and the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament; in 1960 he was a founder member of the Committee of 100 and this led to a short imprisonment in 1961 with Bertrand Russell and other members of the Committee of 100 for encouraging mass non-violent civil disobedience. Metzger's political activism provided the foundation for his first artist manifesto in 1959, titled "Auto-destructive Art", which he described 'as a desperate last-minute subversive political weapon... an attack on the capitalist system... (an attack also on artdealers and collectors who manipulate modern art for profit.)' Autodestructive art sought to provide a mirror of a social and political system that Metzger felt was progressing towards total obliteration. At the heart of his practice, which spanned over 65 years, are a series of constantly opposing yet interdependent forces such as destruction and creation.

1 Item(s)

per page

Set Descending Direction
  1. Daily Express

    Gustav Metzger
    Daily Express

    €170.00

    Numbered copy
    15 newspapers headlines from October 23 to November 8, 1962 
    30 pages
    66.4 x 47.5 cm each
    Limited edition of 50 numbered copies
    Produced and published in 2019 by mfc-michèle didier

    Learn more

1 Item(s)

per page

Set Descending Direction